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Overview of Protozoan Infectious Diarrhea in the Pediatric Population
Course List

  • CME Front Matter

Downloadable Education Resources

Sponsorship Statement

This continuing medical education activity is provided by: Vindico Medical Education

Support Statement

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Target Audience

The intended audience for the activity is pediatric infectious disease, pediatric gastroenterologists, pediatricians, and family practice physicians involved in the treatment of patients with protozoan infectious diarrhea.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this video series, participants should be able to:

  • Review the pathophysiology, risk factors, epidemiology and differential diagnosis of protozoan infectious diarrhea in the pediatric population.

  • Diagnose protozoan infectious diarrhea early by instituting the appropriate screening, laboratory assays, stool analysis and cultures to reduce morbidity and the spread of disease.

  • Assess the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of current treatment options for protozoan infectious diarrhea in pediatric patients.

  • Utilize treatments for protozoan infectious diarrhea that are well-tolerated, effective against resistant organisms, and offer convenient dosing schedules to improve adherence to therapy.

Faculty

Overview of Protozoan Infectious Diarrhea in the Pediatric Population
Clayton D. Harro, MD, ScM (Course Chair)
Center for Immunization Research
Johns Hopkins University
Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore, MD

Pathophysiology, Risk Factors, and Epidemiology of Protozoan Infectious Diarrhea
Jonathan S. Yoder, MSW, MPH
Waterborne Disease & Outbreak Surveillance Coordinator, CDC
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch
Atlanta, GA

Differential Diagnosis of Protozoan Infectious Diarrhea
Asuncion G. Ramos-Soriano, MD, FAAP
Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Fellowship, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Johns Hopkins Hospital
Laredo, TX

Treating Protozoan Infectious Diarrhea in Children
Steven J. Czinn, MD, FAAP, FACG, AGAF
Professor and Chair
Department of Pediatrics
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Physician-in-Chief
University of Maryland Children's Hospital
Baltimore, MD

Accreditation

Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

Vindico Medical Education designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0, AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™, 0.25 credits per video. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This enduring material is approved for 1 year from the date of original release, June 19, 2014, to June 18, 2015.

How To Participate in this Activity and Obtain CME Credit

To participate in this CME activity, you must read the objectives, answer the pretest questions, watch the interviews, complete the CME posttest, and complete the evaluation. Provide only one (1) correct answer for each question. A satisfactory score is defined as answering 75% of the posttest questions correctly for each video. Upon receipt of the completed materials, if a satisfactory score on the posttest is achieved, Vindico Medical Education will issue an AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ Certificate

Planning Committee and Faculty

Clayton D. Harro, MD, ScM
Steven J. Czinn, MD, FAAP, FACG, AGAF
Asuncion G. Ramos-Soriano, MD, FAAP
Jonathan S. Yoder, MSW, MPH

Exernal Reviewer

Ronald Codario, MD, FACP, FNLA, CCMEP

Disclosures

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears on this page.

  • Planning Committee and Faculty members report the following relationship(s):
    • Clayton D. Harro, MD, ScM
      • Consulting Fee: Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
      • Contracted Research: DOD, PATH

    • Steven J. Czinn, MD, FAAP, FACG, AGAF
      • Scientific Advisory Board: Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

    • Asuncion G. Ramos-Soriano, MD, FAAP
      • No relevant financial relationships to disclose

    • Jonathan S. Yoder, MSW, MPH
      • No relevant financial relationships to disclose

  • Reviewer reports the following relationship(s):
    • Ronald A. Codario, MD, FACP, FNLA, CCMEP
      • No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

  • Vindico Medical Education staff report the following relationship(s):
    • No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

  • Signed disclosures are on file at Vindico Medical Education, Office of Medical Affairs and Compliance.

Overview

It is estimated that there are 1.2 million cases of giardiasis and 750,000 cases of cryptosporidiosis in the United States annually. Cryptosporidium and Giardia are the two most common protozoal causes of diarrhea in the developed and developing world. Persistent diarrhea, common in community pediatrics, is often caused by organisms such as Giardia and Cryptosporidium. This activity will focus on the most clinically relevant information on pathophysiology, risk factors, epidemiology and differential diagnosis of protozoan infectious diarrhea in the pediatric population. In addition, the safety, efficacy and mechanisms of action of current treatment options for protozoan infectious diarrhea in pediatric patients, will be evaluated so clinicians are able to confidently use these agents in practice.

Unlabeled and Investigational Usage

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage. All activity participants will be informed if any speakers/authors intend to discuss either non-FDA approved or investigational use of products/devices.

Copyright Statement

Created and published by Vindico Medical Education, 6900 Grove Road, Building 100, Thorofare, NJ 08086-9447. Telephone: 856-994-9400; Fax: 856-384-6680. Printed in the USA. Copyright © 2014 Vindico Medical Education. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. The material presented at or in any of Vindico Medical Education continuing medical education activities does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Vindico Medical Education. Neither Vindico Medical Education nor the faculty endorse or recommend any techniques, commercial products, or manufacturers. The faculty/authors may discuss the use of materials and/or products that have not yet been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. All readers and continuing education participants should verify all information before treating patients or utilizing any product.

Questions?

Contact us at cme@vindicomeded.com